Audio Journeys from Travel Radio International (TM)
Audio Journeys consist of on-location interviews with experts and the related sounds of the subject. Each month, Audio Journeys are posted from around the world. Audio Journeys are highly edited for content and English. Audio and photos copyrights Travel Radio International and Associates.
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Patricia Lawrence and guest recording Audio Journeys in Augsburg Germany
Audio Journey Radio Series
Audio Journeys are half-hour documentary style radio programs. Audio Journeys consist of on-location interviews with experts and the sounds of the subjects. New Audio Journeys each month. Email Adventures@AudioJourneys.org www.AudioJourneys.org
Photo Patricia Lawrence and guest recording Audio Journeys in Augsburg Germany
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October 2007 Episodes:
  • Pub Date: Oct 24, 2007 - 1:29 am
  • Virginia's Explore Park Frontier Fort
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  • This site uses Flash Player 10 and HTML5 Audio
  • We are on a Four-Hundred-Years-of-History road trip across the Commonwealth of Virginia.

    We’re here in the Blue Ridge Mountains, southeast of Roanoke, Virginia.

    Virginia’s Explore Park interprets what life was like
    for some people in the Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Nineteenth centuries’ in western Virginia.

    Costumed historians
    tell visitors about life
    in each of the centuries.

    In the early Seventeen-hundreds,
    the Blue Ridge Mountains of Western Virginia were settled by Germans, Scotch and Irish.
    These immigrants had cut all ties with Europe.
    Having nothing to lose
    these pioneers bravely began
    to settle the wilDERness.

    In the turbulent decade of the Seventeen-fifties,
    to protect their families, livestock, and neighbors
    the settlers in Augusta County, Virginia,
    built wooden stockades around their homes.

    Virginia’s Explore Park has reconstructed
    a Seventeen-fifty-seven frontier fort.
    Patricia Lawrence has arrived at the site with Deborah Pitts, Executive Director of Virginia’s Explore Park.

    We meet two historians in period costumes at the large wooden gate of the eighteenth-century frontier fort.

  • Pub Date: Oct 13, 2007 - 1:29 am
  • Virginia's Explore Park Totero Indians
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  • This site uses Flash Player 10 and HTML5 Audio
  • We are on a Four-Hundred-Years-of-History road trip
    across the Commonwealth of Virginia. In the Blue Ridge Mountains,
    Explore Park interprets what life was like,
    in the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries
    of Western Virginia. Knowledgeable historians
    in period costumes tell visitors about life in each of the centuries.
    In the land that was to become the United States of America,
    the seventeenth century was a time of great change for indigenous people like the small populations of Totero’s
    that lived in the Blue Ridge Mountains.


    The now-extinct Totero’s were an Eastern woodland society.
    Virginia’s Explore Park has reconstructed a Sixteen-Seventy-One Totero Village.
  • Pub Date: Oct 09, 2007 - 1:58 am
  • Booker T Washington National Mounment, Hardy Virginia
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  • This site uses Flash Player 10 and HTML5 Audio
  • We are on a 400-Years-of-History, road trip across the Commonwealth of Virginia. Thirty miles south-east of Roanoke, near Hardy Virginia, we stop to explore the Booker T. Washington National Monument. The Booker T Washington National Monument is located on the tobacco plantation where Booker T Washington was born into slavery, on April 5, 1856. From his very meager and miserable beginnings, Booker T Washington became one of the United States’ foremost African-American educators, and the founder of the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.

    We are exploring the Booker T Washington National Monument in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Patricia Lawrence meets our guide, National Park Service Ranger Betsy Haynes, at the Visitors Center, overlooking the 207 acre Burroughs plantation. We walk on the Plantation Trail to the reconstructed Slave Cabin, where Booker T Washington was born, and lived the first nine years of his life.